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Statins could be valuable addition to breast cancer treatment

1st June 2016

Scientists have raised the possibility of using statins, cholesterol reducing drugs, to stop some breast cancers returning. The most common form of breast cancer in the UK is oestrogen receptor (ER) positive which uses oestrogen to grow. Hormone therapy drugs such as ‘tamoxifen’ and aromatase inhibitors cut off the supply of oestrogen, reducing the chances the ...

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Cancer clinical trials to be streamlined to bring new treatments to UK patients sooner

1st June 2016

Earlier this week saw an agreement signed between UK cancer clinical trial centers making new clinical trials easier and more efficient to set up. The Experimental Cancer Medical Centre (ECMC) collaboration agreement will improve the UK’s ability to carry out early phase trials, boosting research to bring new treatments to patients sooner. The UK currently faces ...

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Encouraging new drug found to inhibit growth of most aggressive type of breast cancer

1st June 2016

According to research published in the journal Oncogene earlier this week, researchers from Nottingham and Oxford Universities have found a new technique to slow the growth of one of the most aggressive forms of breast cancer. The drug, called JQ1, has shown promising results both in vitro and on human cancer cells in mice, and ...

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Belfast researchers discover potential new way to better tailor treatments for early breast tumours

1st May 2016

Dr Niamh Buckley and her team at Queen’s University Belfast, have discovered a way to predict the likelihood that women who are diagnosed with non-invasive breast cancer will go on to develop an invasive form of the disease. This information could enable doctors to tailor the patient’s treatment to their specific needs. In the UK there ...

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Scientists hail ‘Milestone’ genetic find for breast cancer

1st May 2016

Personalised treatment for breast cancer could become commonplace as scientists reveal they have compiled the most detailed picture of which genetic mutations are involved in the disease. The findings were published in the journals ‘Nature’ and ‘Nature Communications’ and explain which genes cause healthy breast tissue to turn cancerous. Researchers from the Sanger Institute in Cambridge ...

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New research gives deeper understanding of why some breast cancers are hard to treat

1st May 2016

Following on from last week’s article Scientists hail ‘Milestone’ genetic find for breast cancer which looked at which mutated genes are more likely to cause cancer, scientists have been able to use this data to analyse that breast cancer can be classified into 10 different diseases. By researching these 10 subtypes of breast cancer scientists at ...

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800 people a day get a cancer diagnosis

1st February 2016

Reported in the press today was the fact that more than 800 people a day are diagnosed with cancer in England. Figures show that the number is rising, with 296,863 new cases in 2014.  Breast, lung, prostate and bowel cancers account for more than half of cases, says the Office for National Statistics.

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Hastings Direct raises over £100,000 for the Pink Ribbon Foundation

1st February 2016

We are delighted to announce that our corporate partner Hastings Direct raised over £104,400 for the Pink Ribbon Foundation in 2015. The general insurance provider raised the charitable monies via Hastings Direct brand, insurePink where £10 from every car and home, and £1 from every travel insurance policy sold online is donated to the Foundation. ...

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Scientists identify protein used by breast cancer tumours to recruit normal cells and promote cancer spread

1st January 2016

Researchers at The Institute of Cancer Research have discovered that more aggressive forms of breast cancer secrete a protein called Wnt7a which recruits and mutates surrounding cells to promote the spread of the disease. The team examined nearly 900 breast cancer samples and found that women who had high levels of Wnt7a were at higher ...

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New study of crucial molecule in breast cancer recurrence

1st December 2015

A leading scientist from Birmingham has been awarded a grant of more than £200,000 by research charity Breast Cancer Now to study how a particular molecule called PRMT5 might be helping breast cancer stem cells survive – making tumours more likely to grow back after treatment. Breast stem cells are a rare group of cells ...

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Some of the charities who we’ve helped

Please send us an e-mail, write or telephone to:

Jonathan Prince, Trustee. The Pink Ribbon Foundation.
Crofton House, 5 Morley Close, Orpington, Kent BR6 8JR

(t) 01689 858877 (e) enquiries@pinkribbonfoundation.org.uk.

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